X

What Are The Health Benefits Of Star Fruit (Averrhoa carambola)?

JEROME MICHAEL EBRUPHIYO Thursday, September 23, 2021 Science and Nature

 
This post will provide information on "What are the health benefits of star fruit (Averrhoa carambola)?" as well as provide answers to questions like: Who discovered the star fruit? Why is star fruit called star fruit? Where is star fruit grown India? How long has star fruit been around? What are the benefits of eating star fruit? When should you eat star fruit? What are the side effects of star fruit? Can I eat star fruit everyday?

History of Star Fruit (Averrhoa carambola)

The center of diversity and the original range of Averrhoa carambola is tropical Southeast Asia, where it has been cultivated over centuries. It was introduced to the Indian Subcontinent and Sri Lanka by Austronesian traders, along with ancient Austronesian cultigens like coconuts, langsat, noni, and santol. They remain common in those areas and in East Asia and throughout Oceania and the Pacific Islands. They are cultivated commercially in India, Southeast Asia, southern China, Taiwan, and the state of Florida in United States. They are also grown in Central America, South America, and Hawaii, the Caribbean, and parts of Africa. They are grown as ornamentals. Carambola is considered to be at risk of becoming an invasive species in many world regions. Carambola, also known as star fruit or 5 fingers, is the fruit of Averrhoa carambola, a species of tree native to tropical Southeast Asia. The fruit is commonly consumed in parts of Brazil, Southeast Asia, South Asia, the South Pacific, Micronesia, parts of East Asia, the United States, and the Caribbean. The tree is cultivated throughout tropical areas of the world. The fruit has distinctive ridges running down its sides (usually 5–6). When cut in cross-section, it resembles a star, giving it the name of star fruit. The entire fruit is edible, usually raw, and may be cooked or made into relishes, preserves, garnish, and juices.

Description of Star Fruit (Averrhoa carambola)

The carambola tree has a short trunk with many branches, reaching up to 9 m (30 ft) in height. Its deciduous leaves are 15–25 cm (6–10 in) long, with 5 to 11 ovate leaflets medium-green in color. Flowers are lilac in color, with purple streaks, and are about 5 mm (1/4 in) wide. The showy fruits have a thin, waxy pericarp, orange-yellow skin, and crisp, yellow flesh with juice when ripe. The fruit is about 5 to 15 cm (2 to 6 in) in length and is an oval shape. It usually has five or six prominent longitudinal ridges. In cross section, it resembles a star. The flesh is translucent and light yellow to yellow in color. Each fruit can have 10 to 12 flat light brown seeds about 5–15 mm (1/4–1/2 in) in width and enclosed in gelatinous aril. Once removed from the fruit, they lose viability within a few days. Like the closely related bilimbi, there are two main types of carambola: the small sour (or tart) type and the larger sweet type. The sour varieties have a higher oxalic acid content than the sweet type. A number of cultivars have been developed in recent years. The most common cultivars grown commercially include the sweet types "Arkin" (Florida), "Yang Tao" (Taiwan), "Ma fueng" (Thailand), "Maha" (Malaysia), and "Demak" (Indonesia) and the sour types "Golden Star", "Newcomb", "Star King", and "Thayer" (all from Florida). Some of the sour varieties like "Golden Star" can become sweet if allowed to ripen.

Nutritional Composition of Star Fruit (Averrhoa carambola)

Single, medium-sized (91-gram) star fruit (1):
  • Fiber: 3 grams
  • Protein: 1 gram
  • Vitamin C: 52% of the RDI
  • Vitamin B5: 4% of the RDI
  • Folate: 3% of the RDI
  • Copper: 6% of the RDI
  • Potassium: 3% of the RDI
  • Magnesium: 2% of the RDI

| Comments | Views(82)

What Are The Health Benefits Of Star Fruit (Averrhoa carambola)?

JEROME MICHAEL EBRUPHIYO Thursday, September 23, 2021 Science and Nature

 
This post will provide information on "What are the health benefits of star fruit (Averrhoa carambola)?" as well as provide answers to questions like: Who discovered the star fruit? Why is star fruit called star fruit? Where is star fruit grown India? How long has star fruit been around? What are the benefits of eating star fruit? When should you eat star fruit? What are the side effects of star fruit? Can I eat star fruit everyday?

History of Star Fruit (Averrhoa carambola)

The center of diversity and the original range of Averrhoa carambola is tropical Southeast Asia, where it has been cultivated over centuries. It was introduced to the Indian Subcontinent and Sri Lanka by Austronesian traders, along with ancient Austronesian cultigens like coconuts, langsat, noni, and santol. They remain common in those areas and in East Asia and throughout Oceania and the Pacific Islands. They are cultivated commercially in India, Southeast Asia, southern China, Taiwan, and the state of Florida in United States. They are also grown in Central America, South America, and Hawaii, the Caribbean, and parts of Africa. They are grown as ornamentals. Carambola is considered to be at risk of becoming an invasive species in many world regions. Carambola, also known as star fruit or 5 fingers, is the fruit of Averrhoa carambola, a species of tree native to tropical Southeast Asia. The fruit is commonly consumed in parts of Brazil, Southeast Asia, South Asia, the South Pacific, Micronesia, parts of East Asia, the United States, and the Caribbean. The tree is cultivated throughout tropical areas of the world. The fruit has distinctive ridges running down its sides (usually 5–6). When cut in cross-section, it resembles a star, giving it the name of star fruit. The entire fruit is edible, usually raw, and may be cooked or made into relishes, preserves, garnish, and juices.

Description of Star Fruit (Averrhoa carambola)

The carambola tree has a short trunk with many branches, reaching up to 9 m (30 ft) in height. Its deciduous leaves are 15–25 cm (6–10 in) long, with 5 to 11 ovate leaflets medium-green in color. Flowers are lilac in color, with purple streaks, and are about 5 mm (1/4 in) wide. The showy fruits have a thin, waxy pericarp, orange-yellow skin, and crisp, yellow flesh with juice when ripe. The fruit is about 5 to 15 cm (2 to 6 in) in length and is an oval shape. It usually has five or six prominent longitudinal ridges. In cross section, it resembles a star. The flesh is translucent and light yellow to yellow in color. Each fruit can have 10 to 12 flat light brown seeds about 5–15 mm (1/4–1/2 in) in width and enclosed in gelatinous aril. Once removed from the fruit, they lose viability within a few days. Like the closely related bilimbi, there are two main types of carambola: the small sour (or tart) type and the larger sweet type. The sour varieties have a higher oxalic acid content than the sweet type. A number of cultivars have been developed in recent years. The most common cultivars grown commercially include the sweet types "Arkin" (Florida), "Yang Tao" (Taiwan), "Ma fueng" (Thailand), "Maha" (Malaysia), and "Demak" (Indonesia) and the sour types "Golden Star", "Newcomb", "Star King", and "Thayer" (all from Florida). Some of the sour varieties like "Golden Star" can become sweet if allowed to ripen.

Nutritional Composition of Star Fruit (Averrhoa carambola)

Single, medium-sized (91-gram) star fruit (1):
  • Fiber: 3 grams
  • Protein: 1 gram
  • Vitamin C: 52% of the RDI
  • Vitamin B5: 4% of the RDI
  • Folate: 3% of the RDI
  • Copper: 6% of the RDI
  • Potassium: 3% of the RDI
  • Magnesium: 2% of the RDI

| Comments | Views(82)

Add your comment


Other Posts
Emmason Integratded Services(2017-2022)
All Rights Reserved
Designed and Maintained By Emmason Integrated Services