X

List Of The 11 Provinces/States Of Armenia And Their Capitals

JEROME MICHAEL EBRUPHIYO Tuesday, November 23, 2021 Basis

 

Introduction

This article will provide information on the list of the 11 provinces/states of Armenia and their capitals, brief history of Armenia and also provide answers to questions regarding Armenia as a country.

Brief History of Armenia

The history of Armenia covers the topics related to the history of the Republic of Armenia, as well as the Armenian people, the Armenian language, and the regions historically and geographically considered Armenian. Armenia is located in the highlands surrounding the Biblical mountains of Ararat. The original Armenian name for the country was Hayk, later Hayastan (Armenian: ????????), translated as 'the land of Hayk', derived from Hayk and the Persian suffix '-stan' ("land"). The historical enemy of Hayk (the legendary ruler of Armenia) was Bel, or in other words Baal (Akkadian cognate Belu). The name Armenia was given to the country by the surrounding states, and it is traditionally derived from Armenak or Aram (the great-grandson of Haik's great-grandson, and another leader who is, according to Armenian tradition, the ancestor of all Armenians). In the Bronze Age, several states flourished in the area of Greater Armenia, including the Hittite Empire (at the height of its power), Mitanni (southwestern historical Armenia), and Hayasa-Azzi (1600–1200 BC). Soon after the Hayasa-Azzi were the Nairi tribal confederation (1400–1000 BC) and the Kingdom of Urartu (1000–600 BC), who successively established their sovereignty over the Armenian Highland. Each of the aforementioned nations and tribes participated in the ethnogenesis of the Armenian people. Yerevan, the modern capital of Armenia, dates back to the 8th century BC, with the founding of the fortress of Erebuni in 782 BC by King Argishti I at the western extreme of the Ararat plain. Erebuni has been described as "designed as a great administrative and religious centre, a fully royal capital." The Iron Age kingdom of Urartu (Assyrian for Ararat) was replaced by the Orontid dynasty. Following Persian and subsequent Macedonian rule, the Artaxiad dynasty from 190 BC gave rise to the Kingdom of Armenia which rose to the peak of its influence under Tigranes II before falling under Roman rule. In 301, Arsacid Armenia was the first sovereign nation to accept Christianity as a state religion. The Armenians later fell under Byzantine, Sassanid Persian, and Islamic hegemony, but reinstated their independence with the Bagratid Dynasty kingdom of Armenia. After the fall of the kingdom in 1045, and the subsequent Seljuk conquest of Armenia in 1064, the Armenians established a kingdom in Cilicia, where they prolonged their sovereignty to 1375. Starting in the early 16th century, Greater Armenia came under Safavid Persian rule; however, over the centuries Western Armenia fell under Ottoman rule, while Eastern Armenia remained under Persian rule. By the 19th century, Eastern Armenia was conquered by Russia and Greater Armenia was divided between the Ottoman and Russian Empires. In the early 20th century, the Armenians suffered in the genocide which was committed against them by the Ottoman government of Turkey, in which 1.5 million Armenians were killed and many more Armenians were dispersed throughout the world via Syria and Lebanon. From then on, Armenia, whose territory corresponded to much of the territory of Eastern Armenia, regained its independence in 1918, with the establishment of the First Republic of Armenia, and in 1991, the Republic of Armenia was established. In 301, Armenia became the first nation to adopt Christianity as a state religion, amidst the long-lasting geo-political rivalry over the region. It established a church that today exists independently of both the Catholic and the Eastern Orthodox churches, having become so in 451 after having rejected the Council of Chalcedon. The Armenian Apostolic Church is a part of the Oriental Orthodox communion, not to be confused with the Eastern Orthodox communion. The first Catholicos of the Armenian church was Saint Gregory the Illuminator. Because of his beliefs, he was persecuted by the pagan king of Armenia, and was "punished" by being thrown in Khor Virap, in modern-day Armenia. He acquired the title of Illuminator, because he illuminated the spirits of Armenians by introducing Christianity to them. Before this, the dominant religion amongst the Armenians was Zoroastrianism. It seems that the Christianisation of Armenia by the Arsacids of Armenia was partly in defiance of the Sassanids. In 405–06, Armenia's political future seemed uncertain. With the help of the King of Armenia, Mesrop Mashtots created a unique alphabet to suit the people's needs. By doing so, he ushered in a new Golden Age and strengthened Armenian national identity. After years of rule, the Arsacid dynasty fell in 428, with Eastern Armenia being subjugated to Persia and Western Armenia, to Rome. In the 5th century, the Sassanid Shah Yazdegerd II tried to tie his Christian Armenian subjects more closely to the Sassanid Empire by reimposing the Zoroastrian religion. The Armenians greatly resented this, and as a result, a rebellion broke out with Vartan Mamikonian as the leader of the rebels. Yazdegerd thus massed his army and sent it to Armenia, where the Battle of Avarayr took place in 451. The 66,000 Armenian rebels, mostly peasants, lost their morale when Mamikonian died in the battlefield. They were substantially outnumbered by the 180,000- to 220,000-strong Persian army of Immortals and war elephants. Despite being a military defeat, the Battle of Avarayr and the subsequent guerilla war in Armenia eventually resulted in the Treaty of Nvarsak (484), which guaranteed religious freedom to the Armenians. Armenia declared its independence from the Soviet Union on 23 August 1990. Independence was confirmed by referendum on 21 September 1991. However, widespread recognition did not occur until the formal dissolution of the Soviet Union on 25 December 1991. Armenia faced many challenges during its first years as a sovereign state. Several Armenian organizations from around the world quickly arrived to offer aid and to participate in the country's early years. From Canada, a group of young students and volunteers under the CYMA - Canadian Youth Mission to Armenia banner arrived in Ararat Region and became the first youth organization to contribute to the newly independent Republic. Following the Armenian victory in the First Nagorno-Karabakh War, both Azerbaijan and Turkey closed their borders and imposed a blockade which they retain to this day, severely affecting the economy of the fledgling republic. In October 2009 Turkey and Armenia signed a treaty to normalize relations.

List of the 11 Provinces/States of Armenia and their Capitals

1. Aragatsotn

This is a province in Armenia occupying about 2,756 kilometer square of the country. It has Ashtarak as its capital.

2. Ararat

This is a province in Armenia occupying about 2,090 kilometer square of the country. It has Artashat as its capital.

3. Armavir

This is a province in Armenia occupying about 1,242 kilometer square of the country. It has Armavir as its capital.

4. Gegharkunik

This is a province in Armenia occupying about 5,349 kilometer square of the country. It has Gavar as its capital.

5. Kotayk

This is a province in Armenia occupying about 2,086 kilometer square of the country. It has Hrazdan as its capital.

6. Lori

This is a province in Armenia occupying about 3,799 kilometer square of the country. It has Vanadzor as its capital.

7. Shirak

This is a province in Armenia occupying about 2,680 kilometer square of the country. It has Gyumri as its capital.

8. Syunik

This is a province in Armenia occupying about 4,506 kilometer square of the country. It has Kapan as its capital.

9. Tavush

This is a province in Armenia occupying about 2,704 kilometer square of the country. It has Ijevan as its capital.

10. Vayots Dzor

This is a province in Armenia occupying about 2,308 kilometer square of the country. It has Yeghegnadzor as its capital.

11. Yerevan

This is a province in Armenia occupying about 223 kilometer square of the country. It does not have a capital.

What was Armenia called in biblical times?

The original Armenian name for the country is Hayk, which was later called Hayastan (land of Hayk). This comes from an ancient legend of Hayk and Bel where Hayk defeats his historical enemy Bel. The word Bel is named in the bible at Isaiah 46:1 and Jeremiah 50:20 and 51:44.

How did Armenia became a country?

Armenia became a country on the 23rd of September, 1991

Who founded Armenia?

The history of Armenia is one of invasion and foreign rule. Historic Armenia traces its lineage back to the 9th century B.C. when a union of local tribes known as Uratu (Ararat) came into being. It was founded by Aram, a legendary national hero, and its people were therefore referred to as Armens or Armenians.

How many states are there in Armenia?

Armenia is subdivided into eleven administrative divisions.

What states do Armenians live in?

According to the 2000 Census, the states with largest Armenian populations were California (204,631), Massachusetts (28,595), New York (24,460), New Jersey (17,094), Michigan (15,746), Florida (9,226), Pennsylvania (8,220), Illinois (7,958), Rhode Island (6,677) and Texas (4,941).

How many regions are in Armenia?

The territory of the Republic of Armenia is composed of ten marzes (regions) and Yerevan city which is governed by the law on local self-government in the city of Yerevan.

Where are the 9 Armenians?

Armenia is located to the southwest, with the Black Sea on one side and the Caspian Sea on the other. As one of the former Soviet republics, Armenia is the smallest of them all.

How old is Armenia?

Armenia is a unitary, multi-party, democratic nation-state with an ancient cultural heritage. The first Armenian state of Urartu was established in 860 BC, and by the 6th century BC it was replaced by the Satrapy of Armenia.

How many cities are there in Armenia?

There are 59 cities in Armenia.

Is Armenia still a state?

Armenia is a unitary, multi-party, democratic nation-state with an ancient cultural heritage. The Kingdom of Armenia reached its height under Tigranes the Great in the 1st century BC and became the first state in the world to adopt Christianity as its official religion in the late 3rd or early 4th century AD.

What is the capital city of Armenia?

The capital of Armenia is Yerevan

Whats the biggest city in Armenia?

The largest city in the country, Yerevan is home to a population of about 1,093,485 and serves as the administrative, cultural, and economic center of Armenia.

| Comments | Views(20)

List Of The 11 Provinces/States Of Armenia And Their Capitals

JEROME MICHAEL EBRUPHIYO Tuesday, November 23, 2021 Basis

 

Introduction

This article will provide information on the list of the 11 provinces/states of Armenia and their capitals, brief history of Armenia and also provide answers to questions regarding Armenia as a country.

Brief History of Armenia

The history of Armenia covers the topics related to the history of the Republic of Armenia, as well as the Armenian people, the Armenian language, and the regions historically and geographically considered Armenian. Armenia is located in the highlands surrounding the Biblical mountains of Ararat. The original Armenian name for the country was Hayk, later Hayastan (Armenian: ????????), translated as 'the land of Hayk', derived from Hayk and the Persian suffix '-stan' ("land"). The historical enemy of Hayk (the legendary ruler of Armenia) was Bel, or in other words Baal (Akkadian cognate Belu). The name Armenia was given to the country by the surrounding states, and it is traditionally derived from Armenak or Aram (the great-grandson of Haik's great-grandson, and another leader who is, according to Armenian tradition, the ancestor of all Armenians). In the Bronze Age, several states flourished in the area of Greater Armenia, including the Hittite Empire (at the height of its power), Mitanni (southwestern historical Armenia), and Hayasa-Azzi (1600–1200 BC). Soon after the Hayasa-Azzi were the Nairi tribal confederation (1400–1000 BC) and the Kingdom of Urartu (1000–600 BC), who successively established their sovereignty over the Armenian Highland. Each of the aforementioned nations and tribes participated in the ethnogenesis of the Armenian people. Yerevan, the modern capital of Armenia, dates back to the 8th century BC, with the founding of the fortress of Erebuni in 782 BC by King Argishti I at the western extreme of the Ararat plain. Erebuni has been described as "designed as a great administrative and religious centre, a fully royal capital." The Iron Age kingdom of Urartu (Assyrian for Ararat) was replaced by the Orontid dynasty. Following Persian and subsequent Macedonian rule, the Artaxiad dynasty from 190 BC gave rise to the Kingdom of Armenia which rose to the peak of its influence under Tigranes II before falling under Roman rule. In 301, Arsacid Armenia was the first sovereign nation to accept Christianity as a state religion. The Armenians later fell under Byzantine, Sassanid Persian, and Islamic hegemony, but reinstated their independence with the Bagratid Dynasty kingdom of Armenia. After the fall of the kingdom in 1045, and the subsequent Seljuk conquest of Armenia in 1064, the Armenians established a kingdom in Cilicia, where they prolonged their sovereignty to 1375. Starting in the early 16th century, Greater Armenia came under Safavid Persian rule; however, over the centuries Western Armenia fell under Ottoman rule, while Eastern Armenia remained under Persian rule. By the 19th century, Eastern Armenia was conquered by Russia and Greater Armenia was divided between the Ottoman and Russian Empires. In the early 20th century, the Armenians suffered in the genocide which was committed against them by the Ottoman government of Turkey, in which 1.5 million Armenians were killed and many more Armenians were dispersed throughout the world via Syria and Lebanon. From then on, Armenia, whose territory corresponded to much of the territory of Eastern Armenia, regained its independence in 1918, with the establishment of the First Republic of Armenia, and in 1991, the Republic of Armenia was established. In 301, Armenia became the first nation to adopt Christianity as a state religion, amidst the long-lasting geo-political rivalry over the region. It established a church that today exists independently of both the Catholic and the Eastern Orthodox churches, having become so in 451 after having rejected the Council of Chalcedon. The Armenian Apostolic Church is a part of the Oriental Orthodox communion, not to be confused with the Eastern Orthodox communion. The first Catholicos of the Armenian church was Saint Gregory the Illuminator. Because of his beliefs, he was persecuted by the pagan king of Armenia, and was "punished" by being thrown in Khor Virap, in modern-day Armenia. He acquired the title of Illuminator, because he illuminated the spirits of Armenians by introducing Christianity to them. Before this, the dominant religion amongst the Armenians was Zoroastrianism. It seems that the Christianisation of Armenia by the Arsacids of Armenia was partly in defiance of the Sassanids. In 405–06, Armenia's political future seemed uncertain. With the help of the King of Armenia, Mesrop Mashtots created a unique alphabet to suit the people's needs. By doing so, he ushered in a new Golden Age and strengthened Armenian national identity. After years of rule, the Arsacid dynasty fell in 428, with Eastern Armenia being subjugated to Persia and Western Armenia, to Rome. In the 5th century, the Sassanid Shah Yazdegerd II tried to tie his Christian Armenian subjects more closely to the Sassanid Empire by reimposing the Zoroastrian religion. The Armenians greatly resented this, and as a result, a rebellion broke out with Vartan Mamikonian as the leader of the rebels. Yazdegerd thus massed his army and sent it to Armenia, where the Battle of Avarayr took place in 451. The 66,000 Armenian rebels, mostly peasants, lost their morale when Mamikonian died in the battlefield. They were substantially outnumbered by the 180,000- to 220,000-strong Persian army of Immortals and war elephants. Despite being a military defeat, the Battle of Avarayr and the subsequent guerilla war in Armenia eventually resulted in the Treaty of Nvarsak (484), which guaranteed religious freedom to the Armenians. Armenia declared its independence from the Soviet Union on 23 August 1990. Independence was confirmed by referendum on 21 September 1991. However, widespread recognition did not occur until the formal dissolution of the Soviet Union on 25 December 1991. Armenia faced many challenges during its first years as a sovereign state. Several Armenian organizations from around the world quickly arrived to offer aid and to participate in the country's early years. From Canada, a group of young students and volunteers under the CYMA - Canadian Youth Mission to Armenia banner arrived in Ararat Region and became the first youth organization to contribute to the newly independent Republic. Following the Armenian victory in the First Nagorno-Karabakh War, both Azerbaijan and Turkey closed their borders and imposed a blockade which they retain to this day, severely affecting the economy of the fledgling republic. In October 2009 Turkey and Armenia signed a treaty to normalize relations.

List of the 11 Provinces/States of Armenia and their Capitals

1. Aragatsotn

This is a province in Armenia occupying about 2,756 kilometer square of the country. It has Ashtarak as its capital.

2. Ararat

This is a province in Armenia occupying about 2,090 kilometer square of the country. It has Artashat as its capital.

3. Armavir

This is a province in Armenia occupying about 1,242 kilometer square of the country. It has Armavir as its capital.

4. Gegharkunik

This is a province in Armenia occupying about 5,349 kilometer square of the country. It has Gavar as its capital.

5. Kotayk

This is a province in Armenia occupying about 2,086 kilometer square of the country. It has Hrazdan as its capital.

6. Lori

This is a province in Armenia occupying about 3,799 kilometer square of the country. It has Vanadzor as its capital.

7. Shirak

This is a province in Armenia occupying about 2,680 kilometer square of the country. It has Gyumri as its capital.

8. Syunik

This is a province in Armenia occupying about 4,506 kilometer square of the country. It has Kapan as its capital.

9. Tavush

This is a province in Armenia occupying about 2,704 kilometer square of the country. It has Ijevan as its capital.

10. Vayots Dzor

This is a province in Armenia occupying about 2,308 kilometer square of the country. It has Yeghegnadzor as its capital.

11. Yerevan

This is a province in Armenia occupying about 223 kilometer square of the country. It does not have a capital.

What was Armenia called in biblical times?

The original Armenian name for the country is Hayk, which was later called Hayastan (land of Hayk). This comes from an ancient legend of Hayk and Bel where Hayk defeats his historical enemy Bel. The word Bel is named in the bible at Isaiah 46:1 and Jeremiah 50:20 and 51:44.

How did Armenia became a country?

Armenia became a country on the 23rd of September, 1991

Who founded Armenia?

The history of Armenia is one of invasion and foreign rule. Historic Armenia traces its lineage back to the 9th century B.C. when a union of local tribes known as Uratu (Ararat) came into being. It was founded by Aram, a legendary national hero, and its people were therefore referred to as Armens or Armenians.

How many states are there in Armenia?

Armenia is subdivided into eleven administrative divisions.

What states do Armenians live in?

According to the 2000 Census, the states with largest Armenian populations were California (204,631), Massachusetts (28,595), New York (24,460), New Jersey (17,094), Michigan (15,746), Florida (9,226), Pennsylvania (8,220), Illinois (7,958), Rhode Island (6,677) and Texas (4,941).

How many regions are in Armenia?

The territory of the Republic of Armenia is composed of ten marzes (regions) and Yerevan city which is governed by the law on local self-government in the city of Yerevan.

Where are the 9 Armenians?

Armenia is located to the southwest, with the Black Sea on one side and the Caspian Sea on the other. As one of the former Soviet republics, Armenia is the smallest of them all.

How old is Armenia?

Armenia is a unitary, multi-party, democratic nation-state with an ancient cultural heritage. The first Armenian state of Urartu was established in 860 BC, and by the 6th century BC it was replaced by the Satrapy of Armenia.

How many cities are there in Armenia?

There are 59 cities in Armenia.

Is Armenia still a state?

Armenia is a unitary, multi-party, democratic nation-state with an ancient cultural heritage. The Kingdom of Armenia reached its height under Tigranes the Great in the 1st century BC and became the first state in the world to adopt Christianity as its official religion in the late 3rd or early 4th century AD.

What is the capital city of Armenia?

The capital of Armenia is Yerevan

Whats the biggest city in Armenia?

The largest city in the country, Yerevan is home to a population of about 1,093,485 and serves as the administrative, cultural, and economic center of Armenia.

| Comments | Views(20)

Add your comment


Other Posts
Emmason Integratded Services(2017-2022)
All Rights Reserved
Designed and Maintained By Emmason Integrated Services